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Delicious Homemade Yoghurt

With our Yoghurt Cultures you can make the yoghurt you want.

Greek Style Yoghurt
A really thick creamy yoghurt, made with regular full cream, or low fat milk.
Ultra Convenient Yoghurt, using UHT milk
Simple to follow directions for making beautiful thick and creamy yoghurt ... without heat processing the milk.
Milk Powder based Yoghurt
Ideal for camping trips, and anytime you have no access to milk.
Soy Yoghurt
Use regular yoghurt culture to make soy yoghurt ideal for the lactose intolerant.
Coconut Yoghurt
Make beautiful coconut yoghurt.
Almond Yoghurt
Avoiding dairy & soy milk can be difficult if you love yoghurt, but not impossible.
Lactose Free Dairy Yoghurt
Use "Lactose Free Milk" & our yoghurt cultures to make dairy yoghurt, ideal for the lactose intolerant.

 

 


Making Really Thick
Greek Style Yoghurt
using
Mild or Tangy (Dairy Based) Yoghurt Culture
&
Non-Dairy Culture.

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Follow these directions carefully, using regular full cream, homogenised and pasteurised milk, add our Yoghurt Starter Culture, and you will have the best homemade yoghurt ever .... no preservatives or additives.

Low fat milk can also be used, although the yoghurt may not be as creamy and thick as the "full cream" version.

You will need the following items.

  • A yoghurt maker, or a jar large enough to hold one litre of milk.
  • A stainless steel pot, or glass jug if planning to heat the milk in a microwave.
  • Dairy thermometer.
  • An esky to put the jar in, or a blanket and a warm spot, if you do not have a yoghurt maker.

Your Ingredients

Note:- The amount of culture used for one litre is VERY SMALL.

Directions

Add the milk powder to your milk, and heat treat to 90° C for ten minutes, stirring constantly.

The use of powdered milk is optional, and assists in acheiving a thicker yoghurt.

We have found that two or three drops of Calcium Chloride will help produce yoghurt that is just a little thicker, this step is optional.

Allow the milk to cool to 40° C. Add your starter culture and mix well to ensure the culture is evenly distributed.

Pour your milk into the yoghurt maker, or jar you have selected. Maintain the milk mixture between 37° and 43° C for 8-12 hours, or even longer.

An electric yoghurt maker will maintain the heat very well, but may creep up in temperature as previously mentioned.

The Green Living Australia Yoghurt Maker has been built to maintain the correct temperature range indefinately.

A thermos style yoghurt maker will have directions on maintaining the heat. The only change required here is that in an EasiYo system for example, you should not fill the external container so high with boiling water, as to have it come in direct contact with the yoghurt container as this may scald, and kill some culture. Just fill it to the level of the hole in the baffle, and this will give you the benefit of a heat reservoir, without risking scalding or killing the culture.

If you do not have a yoghurt maker, then place your jar in an esky and add warm water, but do not have very hot, or boiling water, in direct contact with the jar. You can also wrap your jar in a blanket, and place it in a warm place; on top of the hot water heater works well in my laundry.

To check if your yogurt is ready, press a spoon into the surface of the yoghurt and see if the impression of the spoon is left. If so, it is done.

Chill for a few hours, then mix in fruit, jam, or even trail mix, as the yoghurt is served, or eat plain, over homemade apple pie perhaps.

You can also add a Probiotic culture if you wish.

FAQ :- Why should I heat the milk to 90 C. ?

Heating the milk to 90 C for a short time breaks down a protein in milk, enabling the culture to do its work better, making a thicker heartier yoghurt.

If using UHT milk, there is no need to do this as it has already been done as part of the "Ultra Heat Treatment", that UHT stands for.

 


Ultra Convenient
"UHT" Yoghurt
using
Mild or Tangy (Dairy Based) Yoghurt Culture
&
Non-Dairy Culture.

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Your Ingredients

Note:- The amount of culture used for one litre is VERY SMALL.

Directions

Add the milk powder to your milk, and bring your mixture to 40° C. Add your starter culture and mix well to ensure the culture is evenly distributed.

The use of powdered milk is optional, and assists in acheiving a thicker yoghurt.

We have found that two or three drops of Calcium Chloride will help produce yoghurt that is just a little thicker, this step is optional.

Pour your milk into the yoghurt maker, or jar you have selected. Maintain the milk mixture between 37° and 43° C for 8-12 hours, or even longer.

A thermos style yoghurt maker will have directions on maintaining the heat. The only change required here is that in an EasiYo system for example, you should not fill the external container so high with boiling water, as to have it come in direct contact with the yoghurt container as this may scald, and kill some culture. Just fill it to the level of the hole in the baffle, and this will give you the benefit of a heat reservoir, without risking scalding or killing the culture.

If you do not have a yoghurt maker, then place your jar in an esky and add warm water, but do not have very hot, or boiling water, in direct contact with the jar. You can also wrap your jar in a blanket, and place it in a warm place; on top of the hot water heater works well in my laundry.

To check if your yogurt is ready, press a spoon into the surface of the yoghurt and see if the impression of the spoon is left. If so, it is done.

Chill for a few hours, then mix in fruit, jam, or even trail mix, as the yoghurt is served, or eat plain, over homemade apple pie perhaps.

You can also add a Probiotic culture if you wish.

FAQ :- Do I have to add the extra milk powder ?

Adding the extra milk powder simply gives the culture more lactose and dairy protein to "eat", this makes the yoghurt thicker and heartier without adding extra thickeners, such as agar-agar or gelatin.

If you wish to make a thinner "drinking yoghurt" simply leave out the milk powder.

 


Milk Powder Based Yoghurt
using
Mild or Tangy (Dairy Based) Yoghurt Culture
&
Non-Dairy Culture.

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Your Ingredients

Note:- The amount of culture used for one litre is VERY SMALL.

Directions

Mix the milkpowder into water warmed to 40°, or use cold water and then heat to 40° C. Add your starter culture and mix well to ensure the culture is evenly distributed.

Pour your milk into the yoghurt maker, or jar you have selected. Maintain the milk mixture between 37° and 43° C for 8-12 hours, or even longer.

A thermos style yoghurt maker will have directions on maintaining the heat. The only change required here is that in an EasiYo system for example, you should not fill the external container so high with boiling water, as to have it come in direct contact with the yoghurt container as this may scald, and kill some culture. Just fill it to the level of the hole in the baffle, and this will give you the benefit of a heat reservoir, without risking scalding or killing the culture.

If you do not have a yoghurt maker, then place your jar in an esky and add warm water, but do not have very hot, or boiling water, in direct contact with the jar. You can also wrap your jar in a blanket, and place it in a warm place; on top of the hot water heater works well in my laundry.

To check if your yogurt is ready, press a spoon into the surface of the yoghurt and see if the impression of the spoon is left. If so, it is done.

Chill for a few hours, then mix in fruit, jam, or even trail mix, as the yoghurt is served, or eat plain, over homemade apple pie perhaps.

You can also add a Probiotic culture if you wish.

 


Making Soy Yoghurt
using
Mild or Tangy (Dairy Based) Yoghurt Culture,

or make

Vegan Soy Yoghurt
using
Non-Dairy Yoghurt Culture.

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You will need the following items.

  • A yoghurt maker, or a jar large enough to hold one litre of milk.
  • A stainless steel pot, or glass jug if planning to heat the soy milk in a microwave.
  • Dairy thermometer.
  • An esky to put the jar in, or a blanket and a warm spot, if you do not have a yoghurt maker.

Your Ingredients

  • 1 Litre of "Soy" milk
  • 30 grams of sugar (Optional).
    (acts as food for the culture)
  • 1dose of Yoghurt Starter Culture,
    (Up to 100 doses per sachet of culture).
Note:- The amount of culture used for one litre is VERY SMALL.

Directions

Mix the honey/sugar into soy milk warmed to 40, or use cold soy and then heat to 40 C. Add your starter culture and mix well to ensure the culture is evenly distributed.

The sugar, honey, agave nectar, maple syrup or golden syrup, is added as a food source for the living culture, and is optional. You should try with, and without, to find your prefference.

Pour your milk into the yoghurt maker, or jar you have selected. Maintain the milk mixture between 37° and 43 C for 8-12 hours, or even longer.

A thermos style yoghurt maker will have directions on maintaining the heat. The only change required here is that in an EasiYo system for example, you should not fill the external container so high with boiling water, as to have it come in direct contact with the yoghurt container as this may scald, and kill some culture. Just fill it to the level of the hole in the baffle, and this will give you the benefit of a heat reservoir, without risking scalding or killing the culture.

If you do not have a yoghurt maker, then place your jar in an esky and add warm water, but do not have very hot, or boiling water, in direct contact with the jar. You can also wrap your jar in a blanket, and place it in a warm place; on top of the hot water heater works well in my laundry.

To check if your yogurt is ready, press a spoon into the surface of the yoghurt and see if the impression of the spoon is left. If so, it is done.

Chill for a few hours and serve plain, with a bit of jam or some fruit, as per your preference.

Comments :-

Experimentation is OK.

Every brand of Soy Milk is slightly different, so try different brands.

The Soy Protein Powder you use may be different, or even if the same, feel free to try different quantities.

The yoghurt culture acts, and grows by eating the available sugars, or carbohydrates, and turning them into an acid. If you like a more acidic yoghurt feel free to vary the quantity of sugar, or even try sucrose, which is just a more complex sugar.

Feedback :-

If you are getting particularly good results with a variation on the above recipe and directions please share it with us at sales@greenlivingaustralia.com.au


FAQ :- Do I still heat the Soy Milk to 90 C ?

No. Simply mix the soy protein and sugar into the soy milk, and bring the temperature up to 40 C, and add the culture. Then keep your inoculated soy milk warmed to around 40 for about 12 hours, and when it has turned into a nice thick yoghurt refrigerate.

FAQ :- Why is there a special Non-Dairy Culture if regular Mild and Tangy Yoghurt Culturs work with Soy Milk ?

The Mild and Tangy cultures are made on a dairy base, and while the culture is separated from the dairy base, there may be the odd molecule of dairy left behind, and some people are so allergic to dairy that this is enough to be a serious issue.

Other people such as Vegans just wish to avoid dairy altogether.

 


Coconut Yoghurt
using
Mild or Tangy (Dairy Based) Yoghurt Culture,

or make

Vegan Coconut Yoghurt
using
Non-Dairy Yoghurt Culture.

(top of page)

Your Ingredients

  • Approximately 1 litre of Coconut Cream
  • 1 tablespoon or so of sugar,
    or alternative food source for the culture, such as honey.
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons of Classic Pectin
  • 1 dose of Yoghurt Starter Culture.
You will require a whisk.

Note:- The amount of culture used for one litre is VERY SMALL.

Directions

1 litre of Coconut Milk/Cream, poured into your yoghurt maker bowl, or saucepan.

Add 1 tablespoon or so of honey/sugar, and mix in thoroughly.

The sugar, honey, agave nectar, maple syrup or golden syrup, is added as a food source for the living culture.

If your Coconut Yoghurt is too sweet, you can try reducing the amount, but this is a bit of a balancing act between too sweet, and the culture not having enough complex carbohydrates to eat.

Into this whisk the Classic Pectin, adding the pectin, sprinkled in small amounts on top of the coconut milk/cream.

Pectin added to liquid will clump very easily, so do this carefully, if using sugar as the food for the culture, mix the pectin and the sugar, and this will help make mixing it in easier.

The Pectin acts as a thickener, and is essential, although alternative thickeners may be used.

The feedback is that not all pectins work as well as the Classic Pectin, check the ingredients of your pectin, and if there is a list, then any one of those other ingredients may change the outcome. The only ingredient in our Classic Pectin, is pectin.

We have also recently had some feedback that indicates not all coconut milks/creams are created equal, if at first you don't succeed, I recommend trying different coconut creams.

I have used these four

Coconut Creams,

with great results.

Bring your mixture to 40° C, and add the culture,and mix well

Maintain the milk mixture between 37° and 43° C for 18-24 hours.

You may notice a separation of the pectin and the yoghurt after a few hours, this can be stirred back in.

A thermos style yoghurt maker will have directions on maintaining the heat. The only change required here is that in an EasiYo system for example, you should not fill the external container so high with boiling water, as to have it come in direct contact with the yoghurt container as this may scald, and kill some culture. Just fill it to the level of the hole in the baffle, and this will give you the benefit of a heat reservoir, without risking scalding or killing the culture.

If you do not have a yoghurt maker, then place your jar in an esky and add warm water, but do not have very hot, or boiling water, in direct contact with the jar. You can also wrap your jar in a blanket, and place it in a warm place; on top of the hot water heater works well in my laundry.

To check if your yogurt is ready, taste test it. The longer the incubation period at 40° C, the stronger the flavour of the yoghurt should become.

Chill for a few hours, then serve, you can also add a Probiotic culture at the same time as the Yoghurt Culture if you wish.

The firmness and consistency will depend on the amount of pectin used, this can be varied to your personal taste.
You may also have different results depending on the brand of coconut milk/cream used.

This coconut yoghurt, like the almond yoghurt below will have varied results based on the quality of the ingredients, and the amounts used. You should experiment until you have an end result you are happy with ... just like we did.

 


Almond Yoghurt
using
Mild or Tangy (Dairy Based) Yoghurt Culture
&
Non-Dairy Culture.

(top of page)

Your Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups of whole almonds.
  • 1-2 tablespoons of a suger, (to act as food for the culture).
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons of Classic Pectin
  • 1dose of Yoghurt Starter Culture,
    (100 doses per sachet of culture).
Note:- The amount of culture used for one litre is VERY SMALL.

Directions

Soak your almond nuts overnight in chlorine free water.

Drain and rinse the almonds.

Blend the almonds with three and a half cups of chlorine free water, on high speed for about three minutes.

Use a jelly strainer or tight weave cheese making cloth to strain out the pulp, squeezing the last of the milk out is OK.

Heat treat your milk to 90° C for ten minutes, stirring constantly.

Allow to cool to 40° C, and add the pectin and suger while whisking vigorously.

Make sure your mixture is at 40 deg C, and add the culture, and mix in well.

Maintain the milk mixture between 37° and 43° C for 18-24 hours.

To check if your yogurt is ready, press a spoon into the surface of the yoghurt and see if the impression of the spoon is left. If so, it is done.

Chill for a few hours, then mix in fruit, jam, or even trail mix, as the yoghurt is served, or eat plain, over homemade apple pie perhaps.

You can also add a Probiotic culture if you wish.

 


Lactose Free Yoghurt

Using Lactose Free Milk
&
Mild or Tangy (Dairy Based) Yoghurt Cultures,
or
Non-Dairy Yoghurt Culture.

(top of page)

Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest lactose. Lactose is a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy products. Lactose intolerance seems to be a complaint that is on the rise in our society, and we at Green Living Australia have certainly noticed a significant increase, over the years, in the number requests we receive for help in producing lactose free dairy products including cheese and yoghurt.

We have recently found that our yoghurt cultures do work with lactose free milk, although a small amount of sugar may be need to be added as food for the culture depending on the brand of lactose free milk.

Ingredients

  • 1 litre lactose free milk;
  • 25 grams sugar may be required, (to act as food for the culture)
  • 1 dose of Yoghurt starter culture

Directions

If using fresh lactose free milk place it into a stainless steel pot on the stove and heat to 90° C and keep it there for 10 minutes. Let the temperature of your milk drop down to 40° C. You can also heat the milk in a glass jug in the microwave. You can speed the cooling by sitting the pot into cold water, although I would not recommend doing this with a glass jug.

If using UHT lactose free milk this heat processing step can be left out, but we advise preheating the milk to between 35 and 40° C to avoid unbalanced culture growth.

Once your milk has dropped to 40° C add your starter culture and mix well to ensure the culture is evenly distributed.

Pour your milk into the yoghurt maker, or jar you have selected. Maintain the milk mixture between 37° and 43° C for 8-12 hours, or even longer.

An electric yoghurt maker will maintain the heat very well, but may creep up in temperature as previously mentioned.

A thermos style yoghurt maker will have directions on maintaining the heat. The only change required here is that in an EasiYo system for example, you should not fill the external container so high with boiling water, as to have it come in direct contact with the yoghurt container as this may scald, and kill some culture. Just fill it to the level of the hole in the baffle, and this will give you the benefit of a heat reservoir, without risking scalding or killing the culture.

If you do not have a yoghurt maker, then place your jar in an esky and add warm water, but do not have very hot, or boiling water, in direct contact with the jar. You can also wrap your jar in a blanket, and place it in a warm place; on top of the hot water heater works well in my laundry.

To check if your yogurt is ready, press a spoon into the surface of the yoghurt and see if the impression of the spoon is left. If so, it is done.

Chill for a few hours and serve plain, with a bit of jam or some fruit, as per your preference.

 


Cleanliness:

(top of page)

As with making any fermented milk products, cleanliness is vital in yoghurt making. Make sure that you thoroughly clean and sterilise all your utensils before using them. By heating milk to 40° C and then keeping it at that temperature you are deliberately creating the perfect environment to grow bacteria. Just be sure that you are only growing the bacteria (starter culture) that you have introduced, and not some other bacteria that blew in on the wind.

 


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