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The Green Living Australia Blog

Helping you live a more sustainable life.

  • Rose Heart Evening Primrose Soap Recipe

    Ingredients:

    • 120 grams caustic soda
    • 300 grams distilled water
    • 200 grams coconut oil
    • 200 grams sustainable palm oil
    • 400 grams olive oil
    • 50 grams evening primrose oil
    • 15ml rose geranium oil or fragrance of your choice
    Continue reading
  • Eggplant Chutney Recipe

    We had heaps of delicious submissions to our home preserving recipe contest. Thank you all for your generous entries. We are proud to announce the winner of the contest, Madeleine Mionnet, for her outstanding Eggplant Chutney recipe! Congratulations, Madeleine! You're a winner! Award Winning Recipe: Eggplant Chutney by Madeleine Mionnet.

    Ingredients:

    • 1 kg chopped eggplants
    • 1½ cups white vinegar
    • ½ cup balsamic vinegar
    • 1 cup sultanas or currants (chopped)
    • 1½ cups sugar (use less sugar if using raisins)
    • 2 tomatoes (freshly skinned and chopped or use a small can of tinned tomatoes)
    • 1 cup finely chopped red onion
    • 4 cloves freshly minced garlic
    • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
    • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
    • 1 stick cinnamon
    • 2 tablespoons dark sauce (BBQ or HP)

    Optional Extras:

    • 3 ground chillies (or 1 teaspoon chilli powder (optional)
    • 1 tablespoon ground coriander

    To Prepare Eggplants Before Cooking:

    • 2 teaspoons ground turmeric (or 1 tablespoon freshly grated turmeric)
    • 1 - 2 tablespoons salt

    Directions:

    1. Wash, slice and roughly chop the eggplants (no need to peel). Place in a large glass bowl and sprinkle with turmeric and salt and stir through.
    2. Allow to sit for at least four hours until mixture turns yellowy/orange, stirring once or twice.
    3. Drain off the excess liquid by placing eggplants in a colander or strainer (no need to rinse).
    4. Squeeze out excess moisture or blot with paper towel.
    5. Place all ingredients into a large pot. Heat and stir until sugar is dissolved. Allow to simmer until mixture softens and thickens. Keep stirring.
    6. Add a little water if the mixture s become thick before it is cooked through (takes about 40 minutes).
    7. Remove cinnamon stick.
    8. Use a potato masher or "Bamix" type blender to remove larger pieces (optional).
    9. While chutney is still hot, pour into clean, steralised, hot jars and seal with steralised lids.
    10. Process in hot water bath for 10 minutes.
    11. Store in the refrigerator once opened. Makes 6 small jars.

    Enjoy!

  • Free Tips: What To Do With Your Whey

    Whey is a by-product of cheese making that is often thought of as waste. After milk curdles, it separates into curds (solids) and whey (liquid). The curds are then used to make most cheeses. So, what can you do with all that whey left over from making cheese? Whey is full of protein that cannot be captured in the cheese making process and is a low fat food which has many uses in the kitchen. Types of Whey: Sweet whey is the whey left over from cheese making with rennet, such as when you make Feta cheese. Sour whey, also known as acid whey, is the whey left over from cheeses where you have added acid directly to your milk, such as when you make Mozzarella using citric acid and also from non rennet cheeses such as the whey left over from draining quark. You can actually taste the difference in the whey and this means that they are used differently in cooking. Here are a few ideas of ways to use your whey so that it does not go to waste: Whey Cheeses: Ricotta is by far the most popular whey cheese and is made by curdling the whey proteins using heat and acid. The additional proteins leftover from making your first round of cheese are captured into a beautiful fresh cheese that can be eaten right away or used in recipes such as cheese cakes and pasta sauces. Use in Baking: You can use your excess sweet whey in baking recipes, in place of water and milk. This will give the added benefit of additional protein in your final product. Use sweet whey instead of water in your bread making. Use sweet whey instead of milk in cakes, scones and any other baked good where you would have normally used milk. Use sour whey in place of buttermilk. I use sour whey to make buttermilk scones and buttermilk pancakes. Use in Cooking: Use sweet whey instead of water as a base for your soups and stews. Cook your potatoes in sweet whey. Cook grains such as rice in sweet whey. You get the benefit of all that whey protein instead of throwing it out. Use in Drinks: You can use the whey, both sweet and sour, left over from your cheese making in drinks. Just add the whey to smoothies in the morning for breakfast. Health-food stores sell whey protein for you to add to smoothies, so just use the whey and get the benefit of the protein without the cost of the protein powder. Feed it to Your Pets: Feed the whey to your dog or cat. Cook up kitchen scraps in whey to soften them up to feed to your chickens. Use in the Garden: Use sweet whey diluted 50% with water to spray onto your vine crops such as pumpkin, zucchini and cucumbers to help prevent and treat powdery mildew. Freeze for Later: There are so many things you can use whey for, but if you have quite a bit and nothing you want to use it for right now, then you can freeze it for later use. So the next time you have some whey left over, don't throw it out - use it!

  • Probiotic Fermented Vegetables

    Healthy, probiotic fermented vegetables are simple to make with Green Living Australia's Probiotic Culture for Fermented Vegetables, Juices and Yoghurt. One sachet makes up to 100 kg of fermented veggies or up to 100 litres of probiotic juice or milk!

    Equipment:

    • Large glass or stainless steel mixing bowl
    • Cutting board and sharp knife

    Ingredients:

    Directions:

    1. Wash well and chop finely, shred or process a mixture of vegetables of your choice.
    2. Mix together in a large bowl with one to one and a half teaspoons of non-iodised salt per kilo of vegetables. If using herbs, spices and/or kimchi paste, mix in now.
    3. Mix the culture into half a cup of filtered or bottled water and let sit for five to ten minutes.
    4. Pack the vegetables into your sterilised container(s), leaving an inch or two at the top, or into a sterilised crock, leaving room for the stones. Fermentation Pail: If using a pail with grate and airlock, add the 'culture water' to the veggies and top up with filtered or bottled water. Ensure the veggies are well covered and that the water level is above the level of the grate when inserted. Place the grate, top and airlock on the pail and add water to the airlock. Fermentation Crock: If using a crock, add the ‘culture water’ to the veggies and top up with filtered or bottled water. Ensure the stones are well covered, close and fill the ‘moat’ with water or olive oil. Glass Jars: If using jars, share the ‘culture water’ evenly between the jars, then top up with filtered or bottled water to make sure there is enough liquid to reach the top of the vegetables when they are pressed down. Then stuff a couple of rolled-up cabbage leaves in the top of the container to hold the vegetables below the surface of the liquid and seal the container.
    5. Keep in a warm place (25°C to 35°C) for about 7 to 10 days, or longer if the ambient temperature is low. If using jars, they should be opened daily to allow any build-up of gasses from the fermentation to escape. Note: fermentation crocks and Green Living Australia's fermentation pails with airlock do this automatically.
    6. Check the taste after 7 days, by which time they should start tasting vinegary.
    7. When they reach the desired flavour, refrigerate to slow the fermentation process. Your vegetables should have a pH of 4.4 or lower at this point. Test with pH paper if unsure.
    8. Eat as a side dish with your meals, in salads, sandwiches, wraps or as a topping to other foods. The cultured vegetables should be eaten raw to preserve the beneficial enzymes and bacteria.

    Enjoy!

  • Probiotic Fruit & Vegetable Juices

    Healthy, probiotic juices are simple to make with Green Living Australia's Probiotic Culture for Fermented Vegetables, Juices and Yoghurt. One sachet makes up to 100 litres of probiotic juice or milk, or up to 100 kg of fermented veggies!

    Equipment:

    • Sealable glass jar
    • Juicer (optional)

    Ingredients:

    Directions:

    1. Place one litre of preservative free juice in a sealable glass jar. You may want to freshly juice your own fruits and veggies, but you don’t have to.
    2. Add in one dose of Probiotic Culture for Fermented Vegetables, Juices and Yoghurt, close the lid and shake well. Leave at room temperature between 25°C to 36°C for 12 to 24 hours to ferment, or longer if the ambient temperature is low.
    3. The probiotic culture will eat the simple sugars in the juice and turn them into acid, producing bioavailable minerals, live probiotic bacteria and beneficial enzymes, while lowering the Glycemic Index (GI) of the juice. This means the juice becomes even better for you and contains less carbs after it has been fermented!
    4. Store in the refrigerator below 5°C. Consume within 7-10 days.

      Enjoy!

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